Systems (2)

Thursday 24 July 2014

I’m preparing for the gig I’m playing at Cafe Oto next Wednesday.

oto_gig03_s

The basic idea is to create two feedback systems, one digital and one analogue, which can feed into each other.

oto_gig02_s

The digital part is a patch created in AudioMulch.

Oto2014_01_s

The analogue part is made from circuits of effects boxes. It’ll look neater once I’ve finalised the design.

This is a composition: a patterned integrity through which information is shaped into music. As I mentioned before, if the composition is both elegant and robust then the music will come from its design and any performing gestures I make will be in response to the system, without my having to impose my aesthetic will upon it.

New Gigs Coming Up! 29 and 30 July

Thursday 17 July 2014

I’m please to announce that I’m part of the Machinations tour by Jolt Projects. They’re playing two gigs in London, Tuesday 29 July at The Forge and Wednesday 30 July at Cafe Oto.

At The Forge, LRAO will feature duets by cellist Lucy Railton and violinist Aisha Orazbayeva, followed by James Hullick’s post-apocalyptic chamber opera Bruchlandung. Performers on the night include acclaimed German baritone Guillermo Anzorena, Australia‚Äôs eclectic pianist Michael Kieran Harvey and supernatural cellist Judith Hamann.

At Cafe Oto Jolt is presenting The Nis, combining sound artist collective Amplified Elephants, the BOLT Ensemble and, of course, robots. On the same night will be live electronic sets by the legendary John Wall and myself.

I’ll be giving the first live performance of the new, augmented version of this feedback piece I’ve been working on. Hope you can all come along!

Non-systems (1)

Thursday 3 July 2014

On Saturday I got to see and hear the Scratch Orchestra play selections from Nature Study Notes. I saw these guys performing Cage’s Song Books a couple of years ago, and again there was a blurring between art and life. Performers would come and go, participate when they felt most at home with the material, occasionally opting out to sit in the stalls with the audience or stand on the stairs outside. The door to the fire escape stayed open, letting in sounds from the surrounding streets and houses.

Much of the material in the Notes is open to interpretation and speculation. Reading over them after the event, it’s fun to spot how many you can recognise.

I learned later that there had been some general discussion of ideas beforehand, but no group rehearsal. The nature of the Scratch Orchestra music, as alluded to in the notes themselves, had little of the focused intensity of activity found in Cage’s music. An atmosphere of informality and naturalism was sustained throughout – this was achieved largely through the sensitivity and dedication of the performers to the spirit in which the Notes were made. As when observing a street scene, everything that happened in front of the audience fell together into its own sense of order.

There are photos and a complete recording of the performance online.